Friday, 27 November 2015

Another international award for the BBC documentary co-presented by Norman Fenton

Earlier this month I reported that the BBC documentary "Climate Change by Numbers" (that I co-presented) won the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science Journalism Gold Award for "best in-depth TV reporting".

Now the programme has won another prestigious award: the European Science TV and New Media Award for the best Science programme on an environmental issue, 2015.

The new award (see photo below) was presented to BBC Executive Director Jonathan Renouf at a ceremony in Lisbon on 25 November 2015. Jonathan thanked the team involved in the programme, saying:

"I'm absolutely delighted to see the film gain such widespread international recognition. It really is a tribute to the way you managed to bring fresh television insight to a very well trodden subject, and to do it in a way that was genuinely entertaining as well as so innovative. Everyone I've spoken to out here is so impressed with the film. Thank you again for all your hard work, passion and commitment in making the show."

The programme has also recently been screened on TV in a number of other countries. Here is a comprehensive review that appeared in La Monde.   

The European Science TV and New Media Award

Wednesday, 11 November 2015

BBC Documentary co-presented by Norman Fenton wins AAAS Science Journalism Gold Award for "best in-depth TV reporting"

1 Dec Update: the programme has now won another award.

In March Norman Fenton reported on his experience of presenting the BBC documentary "Climate Change by Numbers". The programme has won the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science Journalism Gold Award for "best in-depth TV reporting". The summary citation says:
The Gold Award for in-depth television reporting went to a BBC team for a documentary that used clever analogies and appealing graphics to discuss three key numbers that help clarify important questions about the scale and pace of human influence on climate. The program featured a trio of mathematicians who use numbers to reveal patterns in data, assess risk, and help predict the future.
Jonathan Renouf Executive Producer at BBC Science said (to those involved in the making of the programme):
It’s a huge honour to win this award; it’s a global competition, open to programmes in every area of science, and it’s judged by science journalists. I can’t think of a finer and more prestigious endorsement of the research and journalistic rigour that you brought to bear in the film. We all know how difficult it is to make programmes about climate change that tread the line between entertainment, saying something new, and keeping the story journalistically watertight. I’m really thrilled to see your efforts recognised in top scientific circles.
Full details of the awards can be found on the AAAS website.

Friday, 6 November 2015

Update on the use of Bayes in the Netherlands Appeal Court

In July I reported about the so-called Breda 6 case in the Netherlands and how a Bayesian argument was presented in the review of the case. My own view was that the Bayesian argument was crying out for a Bayesian network representation (I provided a model in my article to do that).

Now Richard Gill has told me the following:
Finally there has been a verdict in the 'Breda 6' case. The suspects were (again) found guilty. The court is somewhat mixed with respect to the Bayesian analysis: On the one hand they ruled that Frans Alkmeye had the required expertise, and that he was rightly appointed as a 'Bayesian expert'. On the other hand they ruled that a Bayesian analysis is still too controversial to be used in court. Therefore they disregarded 'the conclusion' of Frans's report. This is a remarkable and unusual formulation in verdicts, the normal wording is that report has been disregarded.
This unusual wording is no accident: If the court would say that they had disregarded the report, they would lie, since actually quite a lot of the Bayesian reasoning is included in their judgment. A number of considerations from Frans's report are fully paraphrased, and sometimes quoted almost verbatim.
Also I noticed that the assessment of certain findings is expressed in a nicely Bayesian manner.
However: Contrary to Frans's assessment, the court still thinks that the original confessions of three of the suspects contain strong evidence. Unfortunately, the case is not yet closed, but has been taken to the high court.
Frans Alkmeye has also been appointed as a Bayesian expert in yet another criminal case.

The ruling that the Bayesian analysis is too controversial is especially disappointing since we have recently been in workshops with Dutch judges who are very keen to use Bayesian reasoning - and even Bayesian networks (in the Netherlands there are no juries so the judges really do have to make the decisions themselves). These judges - along with Frans Alkemade - will be among many of the world's top lawyers, legal scholars, forensic scientists, and mathematicians participating in the Isaac Newton Institute Cambridge Programme on Probability and Statistics in Forensic Science that will take place July-Dec 2016. This is a programme that I have organised along with David Lagnado, David Balding, Richard Gill and Leila Schneps. It derives from our Bayes and the Law consortium which states that, despite the obvious benefits of using Bayes:

The use of Bayesian reasoning in investigative and evaluative forensic science and the law is, however, the subject of much confusion. It is deployed in the adduction of DNA evidence, but expert witnesses and lawyers struggle to articulate the underlying assumptions and results of Bayesian reasoning in a way that is understandable to lay people. The extent to which Bayesian reasoning could benefit the justice system by being deployed more widely, and how it is best presented, is unclear and requires clarification.
One of the core objectives of the 6-month programme is to address this issue thoroughly. Within the programme there are three scheduled workshops:
  1. "The nature of questions arising in court that can be addressed via probability and statistical methods", Tue 30th Aug 2016 - Tue 30th Aug 2016
  2. "Bayesian networks in evidence analysis", Mon 26th Sep 2016 - Thurs 29th Sep 2016
  3. "Statistical methods in DNA analysis and analysis of trace evidence", Mon 7th Nov 2016 - Mon 7th Nov 2016